New Hospital Plans

Find out about the newest and most updated information by clicking on the following link:  https://www.samhealth.org/newhospitalnewport

 

Overview of the new hospital in Newport

In May, 2015, Pacific Communities Health District (PCHD) voters approved bond measure 21-163 to finance construction of a new state-of-the-art hospital. The bonds will finance several improvements including additional outpatient and inpatient services, new on-site offices for specialty and primary care providers, and compliance with current ADA, seismic and safety standards.

Planning underway for new hospital

The new $57 million hospital will replace the existing hospital and physician offices, portions of which are 60 years old. Money from the bond will pay to build the new hospital building, that will allow for additional specialty and primary care physicians, more clinical services, and additional imaging and treatment capabilities. Several existing buildings will also be upgraded to comply with accessibility and seismic safety standards.

“We are committed to creating a state-of-the-art facility through a process that includes community input and opportunity for involvement by local contractors, “said Fred Postlewait, Pacific Communities Health District board member.

Plans call for increased services and modern medical technology, along with better patient privacy, improved safety and more parking. Inpatient, outpatient and physician offices will be co-located in a single structure, improving access. The modern building will be more energy efficient, lowering future operation costs as well.

The project will include three phases: first — the selection of architects and completion of design including location, size and configuration of departments. The second phase will be construction of the new, three-story hospital and physician offices. When that building is in use, the third phase will be remodeling the 1988 two-story building to accommodate clinical, support and administrative functions. Then the original 1953 building will be removed and the space converted to parking.

Construction of the new hospital will help to support the local economy and provide family-wage jobs in the community.

“We are excited to begin this important project for our community,” said David Bigelow, Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital chief executive officer. “It will enable continued improvement of the health and well-being of the patients we serve.”

Why are health district residents paying for the new hospital?

Because you own Pacific Communities Hospital – including the buildings and land.
“Our hospital exists because of community support dating back to the 1940s, when a group of concerned citizens organized to build its first medical facility. Ever since, each generation has played a key role in enhancing our hospital to meet ever-changing health care needs. We stand on their shoulders and it is our turn to step up for ourselves and for future generations.”

— Don Davis, former Newport City Manager

Brief history of our hospital:

• 1948 – Residents created the nonprofit Pacific Communities Hospital Association
• 1953 – The Association built the first hospital in Newport with donations
• 1972 – Public voted to create the Pacific Communities Health District
• 1976 – Voters approved a bond to build the clinics wing at the hospital
• 1986 – Lincoln Hospital/Health District in Toledo were dissolved
• 1986 – Voters approved a bond to build the two-story addition at the hospital
• 2002 – The District signed an agreement with Samaritan Health Services to operate the hospital in Newport
• 2015 – Pacific Communities Health District (PCHD) voters approved bond measure 23-182 to finance construction of a new state-of-the-art hospital.

– The Neenan Company was selected as the design-builder for the Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital project, and are partnering with Gerding Builders. Press release.

What is the Pacific Communities Health District?
A governmental entity that:

• Owns the Newport hospital and land
• Maintains control over the type of hospital we have in our community and the services it provides
• Consists of a 5 member elected board – Ralph Breitenstein, MD; David Long, MD; Fred Postlewait; Bonnie Saxton; and Kathleen Schonau, RN
• Spans property from Yachats to mid Lincoln Beach
• For more information about the Health District visit their website, www.pchdistrict.org.

What is the role of Samaritan Pacific Health Services?
A contracted service provider that:

• Operates the hospital and provides staff, equipment, furnishings and building maintenance
• Invests in medical equipment – $11 million since 2002
• Will contribute another $10 million in equipment and furnishings for new hospital project

Commonly asked questions

Q: How will the new hospital benefit patients?
The hospital has no room for growth –— making it difficult to add physicians or treatments to meet the diverse health needs of the community. Already patients are experiencing long wait times and are challenged to find a new doctor. The original hospital is more than 60 years old and the physical building is such that new health care technologies cannot be installed, resulting in patients not receiving the most advanced care possible. The hospital also needs to be updated to current seismic, ADA and energy efficiency standards — making it safer for patients.

Q: Who is the Pacific Communities Health District?
A taxing authority with a five-member elected board that was organized in 1972 as a special district under Chapter 440, Oregon Revised Statutes. The District was established to provide health care to residents along the coast from the middle of Lincoln Beach to Yachats. A portion of the property taxes paid in those communities are administered by the District, which owns the hospital buildings and land. Visit their website at pchdistrict.org.

Q: What did the bond measure include and when was the election?
In May 2015, Pacific Communities Health District voters approved Bond Measure 21-163 to finance construction of a new state-of-the-art hospital. The District shall issue 20-year general obligation bonds not exceeding $57 million for new and updated hospital facilities.

Q: How much is it costing me?
The levy is for no more than 98 cents per $1,000 of property assessed value, providing approximately $57 million in funding. For the owner of a property with an assessed value of $150,000, this bond measure equals to an additional $147 annually. The new facility, with greater service capabilities and more clinical specialists, will mean residents won’t need to travel to the valley, saving the cost of travel, which can be more than $100 per trip.

Q: Why is this cost paid by the community? Doesn’t Samaritan Health Services pay anything?
The buildings are a public asset, owned and overseen by the district. Facility additions are funded by the district. Samaritan Health Services pays for the equipment used in patient care. Since 2002, Samaritan has invested more than $11 million in new equipment and has budgeted $10 million more to equip the new structure. In addition, Samaritan pays ongoing maintenance costs for the hospital ($430k in 2014).

Q: Why is Samaritan Health Services paying for the North Lincoln Hospital and not the Pacific Communities Hospital?
Both health districts recently completed facilities assessments that identified a need to develop new hospitals in the near future. The boards of the two health districts made different decisions about how best achieve the goal of a new facility in each of their communities. While the Pacific Communities Health District board asked voters to approve a bond measure that pays for the new facility through property taxes over the next 20 years, the North Lincoln Health District board voted to transfer the hospital facility and adjacent properties to Samaritan Health Services and Samaritan agreed to fund construction of a new facility on the hospital campus.

Q. Why isn’t east Lincoln County included in the District?
Because Toledo had its own hospital until the mid-1980s, it was in a separate health district. When the hospital closed, that health district dissolved. It will take a public election to annex east Lincoln County into the Pacific Communities Health District. Construction costs and interest rates will continue to rise, negating any gains we might have realized by spending time to annex east Lincoln County during the bond campaign.

Q: How is the money being used?
The money will finance the capital costs to: construct a modern hospital for inpatient and outpatient services, including offices for specialty and primary care physicians, and remodeling of existing buildings to allow for more clinical services, such as imaging and other new treatment capabilities. Additionally, it will cover improvements needed comply with ADA, seismic and safety standards, demolition of older structures and improved parking.

Q: Why did you build the Center for Health Education on Highway 101 instead of a new hospital?
The Center for Health Education is a $2.8 million building and the hospital project will be $57 million. The foundation and the health district are paying for the center without a bond measure and using donated funds. Because the focus of health care reform is on prevention and chronic medical condition management, new hospital campuses are now including space for health education. Therefore, we are ahead of the curve and will not have to include one, or its cost, in the bond measure.

Q: How can I help?
Provide your input at the community update meetings. Apply to be a part of the Patient and Family Advisory Council by contacting Addie Demaris at 541-574-4866. Help share the hospital project information within the community.

 

 

Neighbors

The District is seeking voter approval to issue general obligation bonds not exceeding $57,000,000 for new and updated hospital facilities in the May 2015 election.

If approved, this measure would finance capital costs, including to:

  • Construct a modern hospital building to provide inpatient and outpatient services.
  • Construct modern offices to accommodate additional specialty and primary care physicians, more clinical services and additional imaging and treatment capabilities.
  • Remodel and update existing buildings to provide additional and improved clinical and support functions and to comply with ADA, seismic, and safety standards.
  • Make other site improvements, including demolition of older structures, and pay issuance costs.

Approval of this measure would allow the District to replace the existing hospital and physician offices, portions of which are over 60 years old.

The District expects the proposed projects to:

  • Provide space for increased services, modern medical technology, increased patient privacy through more private rooms, and improved safety.
  • Improve the efficiency of and access to services by co-locating inpatient, outpatient and physician offices in a single structure.
  • Optimize building energy use, which will lower building operational costs.

The Bonds may be issued in multiple series and each series may mature over no more than 21 years.

FAQs

Q: How will a bond measure benefit patients?

The Hospital has no room for growth – making it difficult to add physicians or treatments to meet the diverse health needs of the community. Already patients are experiencing long wait times and are challenged to find a new doctor. The original hospital is more than 60 years old and the physical plant is such that new health care technologies cannot be installed, resulting in patients not receiving the most advanced care possible.  The hospital also needs to be updated to current seismic, ADA and energy efficiency standards – making it safer for patients.

Q: Who is the Pacific Communities Health District (District)?

A taxing authority with a five-member elected board that was organized in 1972 as a special district under Chapter 440, Oregon Revised Statues. The District was established to provide health care to residents along the coast from the middle of Lincoln Beach to Yachats. A portion of the property taxes paid in those communities are administered by the District, which owns the hospital buildings and land.

Q: What does the bond measure include and when is the election?

In the May 19 election, you will be asked if the District shall issue 20-year general obligation bonds not exceeding $57 million for new and updated hospital facilities.

Q: How much will it cost me?

The levy is for no more than 0.98 cents per $1,000 of property assessed value, providing approximately $57 million in funding. For the owner of property with an assessed value of $150,000, this bond measure equals an additional $147 annually.  The new facility, with greater service capabilities and more clinical specialists, will mean residents won’t need to travel to the valley, saving the cost of travel, which can be more than $100 per trip.

Q:  Why is this cost paid by the community?  Doesn’t Samaritan Health Services pay anything? The buildings are a public asset, owned and overseen by the District. Facility additions are funded by the District. Samaritan Health Services pays for the equipment used in patient care. Since 2002, Samaritan has invested more than $11 million in new equipment and has budgeted $10 million more to equip the new structure. In addition, Samaritan pays ongoing maintenance costs for the hospital ($430k in 2014). 

Q: Why isn’t East County included in the District?

Because Toledo had its own hospital until the mid 1980s, it was in a separate health district. When the hospital closed, that health district dissolved. It will take a public election to annex East County into the Pacific Communities Health District. Construction costs and interest rates will continue to rise, negating any gains we might realize by spending time to annex East County now. If the bond passes, we can work with those communities to join the District.

Q: How will the money be used?

If approved, this measure will finance capital costs to: construct a modern hospital building to provide inpatient and outpatient services; construct modern offices to accommodate additional specialty and primary care physicians, more clinical services and additional imaging and treatment capabilities; remodel and update existing buildings to provide additional and improved clinical and support functions and to comply with ADA, seismic, and safety standards; and make other site improvements, including demolition of older structures, and improve parking.

Q: Why did you build the Center for Health Education on Hwy. 101 instead of a new hospital?

The Center for Health Education is a $2.8 million building and the hospital project will be $57 million. The Foundation and the Health District are paying for the Center without a bond measure and using donated funds. Because the focus of health care reform is on prevention and chronic medical condition management, new hospital campuses are now including space for health education. Therefore, we are ahead of the curve and will not have to include one, or its cost, in the bond measure.

Measure Number: 21-163

The Pacific Communities Health District (PCHD) is seeking voter approval to issue general obligation bonds not exceeding $57,000,000 for new and updated hospital facilities.

Historical Collaboration:

In 2002 PCHD began a 30-year association with Samaritan Health Services (SHS) to provide health care in the area.

SHS is responsible for operating the hospital and physician clinics.  Over $11 million has been invested by SHS in equipment for diagnostic and treatment capabilities, and SHS has also invested in information technology, including an electronic health record.  PCHD, as owner of the hospital and physician offices, is responsible for additions to buildings and major repairs.  Several projects have been funded by PCHD, totaling $5 million.

In 2008 SHS and PCHD began to consider the resources necessary for future healthcare in the area.  A facility assessment identified a number of needs which could not be met with the current buildings.  A plan was created and recently revised to address the needs and accommodate projected growth over the next 30 years.

New Healthcare Models:

While the volume of inpatient activity at the hospital has remained stable, more healthcare services are occurring on an outpatient basis.  Existing buildings cannot accommodate any new physician practices or services.  Emergency Department resources have been challenged as patient volumes there have grown significantly (20% in the last year).  Outpatient services for cancer care – chemotherapy – and diabetic wound care have grown by 100% in the last five years.   The current facility has no room to grow.

Efficiencies:

The current facility has grown in sporadic fashion.  Older building components are serviced by heating and ventilation systems that are less energy efficient than modern systems.  The proposed measure would optimize building energy use, lowering building operational costs.

Some services occupy multiple locations within the buildings, resulting in less efficient delivery of care and more time required to access services.  Co-location of inpatient, outpatient and physician offices in a single, new structure will address these issues.

Safety and Access:

Seismic and ADA standards have changed since the current facility was built. A new structure would meet current standards, provide a safer environment for the public and ensure the facilities are less vulnerable and more reliable during a disaster. The proposed improvements include more parking near entrances, improving access to services.

New Services and Clinical Providers:

The current buildings do not have adequate space for some of the newer, advanced medical equipment.  The proposed measure would fund space for increased services, modern medical technology, and increased patient privacy through more private rooms.

Physical environment is also a factor when recruiting health professionals.  The District expects the proposed improvements could lead to more success in physician and other healthcare professional recruitment, resulting in better access to services for patients.

Tax Impact:

This measure is estimated to result in a tax of $0.98 per $1,000 of assessed value per year, or approximately $147 per year on property assessed at $150,000.

Learn more at www.neighborsfornewhospital.org